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Changing Land Rights, Changing Land Use
Eriksson, Camilla
The aim of this paper is to identify, document and analyse the change in land use systems as a consequence of the privatisation of agriculture in Kyrgyzstan. Download
Sustainable Land Management in the Tajik Pamirs
Breu, Thomas
PhD Thesis, University of Bern, Switzerland The goals of this study were on the one hand to generate knowledge on the status of and dynamics of the different dimensions of sustainability in the Tajik Pamirs. This process not only consisted of the compilation of features in the economic, socio-cultural and ecological spheres, but also included the appraisal and negotiation of development objectives by different stakeholders levels for a development strategy of the Gorno Badakhshan Autonomous Oblast (GBAO). On the other hand this study was dedicated to appraise land resources problems, land degradation causes and sustainable land management opportunities from a stakeholder perspective. From a conceptual point of view, the research looked at knowledge at different stakeholder levels and its role for sustainable land management.
Moving from sustainable management to sustainable governance of natural resources
Rist, Stephan
"The present paper discusses a conceptual, methodological and practical framework within which the limitations of the conventional notion of natural resource management (NRM) can be overcome. NRM is understood as the application of scientific ecological knowledge to resource management. By including a consideration of the normative imperatives that arise from scientific ecological knowledge and submitting them to public scrutiny, ‘sustainable management of natural resources’ can be recontextualised as ‘sustainable governance of natural resources’. This in turn makes it possible to place the politically neutralising discourse of ‘management’ in a space for wider societal debate, in which the different actors involved can deliberate and negotiate the norms, rules and power relations related to natural resource use and sustainable development. [...]" Journal of Rural Studies 2007, Volume 23, Issue 1, pp. 23-37 Available from: ScienceDirect
Land resources and household strategies in a changed soci-economic environment.
Shigaeva, Jyldyz
The sudden independence of Kyrgyzstan from the Soviet Union in 1991 led to a total rupture of industrial and agricultural production. Based on empirical data, this study seeks to identify key land use transformation processes since the late 1980s, their impact on people’s livelihoods and the implication for natural resources in the communes of Tosh Bulak and Saz, located in the Sokoluk River Basin on the northern slope of the Kyrgyz Range. In: Price M F, editor. Global Change in Mountain Regions. Sapiens, Duncow, Dumfriesshire, UK, pp. 227-228. Abstract.
Land Politics and Conflict in Nepal:
Upreti, Bishnu Raj
Land has always been one of the major causes of armed conflict and structural violence in Nepal. Land is also a source of feudal socio-economic structure in the country. Hence, examining land issues from these perspectives is crucially important to initiate fresh debates on the potential contribution of land reform in the transformation process and addressing the problems of landlessness in the changing political context. This is an effort of researchers and practitioners to examine various aspects of land related issues in Nepal. This work particularly focuses on conflict and exclusion of marginalized people in access to and control of land resources and associated power dynamics in Nepal.
Sustainable land management – a new approach to soil and water conservation in Ethiopia
Mitiku, Haile
This book suggests following the broader approach of Sustainable Land Management (SLM), which aims at ecological soundness, economic viability and social acceptability, and thus places SWC in a more holistic framework that is closer to farmers’ reality. This, however, requires that soil and water conservation (SWC) experts focus less on searching for standard solutions valid once and for all, and more on engaging in a continuous process of developing and adapting technologies with farmers. The present book was written for future SWC and land management experts in Ethiopia. It is based on results of the country’s Soil Conservation Research Program (SCRP), and the experience of researchers, experts, extension workers and Ethiopian peasants. The book aims to encourage readers to take a more critical look at land problems and responses to them, to ask more critical questions, and not to take standard solutions for granted. Download
Putting soils higher on the international agenda
Hurni, Hans
Soils on the global agenda: The report provides an overview of international actions concerned with sustainable land management, based on contributions from members of the IASUS (International Actions for the Sustainable Use of Soil) network made at the Eurosoil Symposium. It also aims to concretise possible follow-up actions. On the occasion of the ISRIC workshop “World Soils Issues and Sustainable Development” held on 10 March 2006, the creation of a World Soils Council (WSC) was initiated. The report presents in its final chapter the WSC’s proposed vision, objectives, and structure. The report was produced by IASUS, a working group of the International Union of Soil Sciences (IUSS), with support from CDE and financing from SDC. This publication is a follow-up of: A World Soils Agenda In: Hans Hurni, Markus Giger, and Konrad Meyer, editors. 2006. Soils on the global agenda. Developing International Mechanisms for Sustainable Land Management. IASUS Working Group of the International Union of Soil Sciences (IUSS). Centre for Development and Environment, Bern. pp. 4-15 Download
The IUSS World Soils Agenda
Hurni, Hans
Soils on the global agenda: The report provides an overview of international actions concerned with sustainable land management, based on contributions from members of the IASUS (International Actions for the Sustainable Use of Soil) network made at the Eurosoil Symposium. It also aims to concretise possible follow-up actions. On the occasion of the ISRIC workshop “World Soils Issues and Sustainable Development” held on 10 March 2006, the creation of a World Soils Council (WSC) was initiated. The report presents in its final chapter the WSC’s proposed vision, objectives, and structure. The report was produced by IASUS, a working group of the International Union of Soil Sciences (IUSS), with support from CDE and financing from SDC. This publication is a follow-up of: A World Soils Agenda (2002) In: Hans Hurni, Markus Giger, and Konrad Meyer, editors. 2006. Soils on the global agenda. Developing International Mechanisms for Sustainable Land Management. IASUS Working Group of the International Union of Soil Sciences (IUSS). Centre for Development and Environment, Bern. pp. 18-25 Download
Transformative Land Reform in Nepal: Ways Forward.
Basnet, Jagat
In this chapter, the understanding of land reform, historic control over land, current situation, power structure of land, debate of land reform since the start of the Maoist movement to the drafting of the Interim Constitution and alternative land reform models are presented. Since land is both political and class issue, economic stability and social justice cannot be established without addressing it. There is no other alternative to a transformative land reform in New Nepal. Hence, in this chapter, attempts are made to explain the concept of a transformatice land reform and its importance in achieving stability, social justice, economic growth and protecting livelihoods of the poor farmers. In: Upreti BR, Sharma SR, Basnet J, editors. Land Politics and Conflict in Nepal: Realities and Potentials for Agrarian Transformation. Kathmandu: Community Self Reliance Centre (CSRC), South Asia Regional Coordination Office of NCCR North-South and Human and Natural Resources Studies Centre (HNRSC), Kathmandu University, pp. 243-265.
Land Degradation and Sustainable Land Management in the Highlands of Ethiopia
Hurni, Hans
The Ethiopian Highlands cover over 50% of the country and are home to more than 90% of Ethiopia's population of over 80 million people (estimate for 2010); 60% of the livestock and 90% of the area suited for agriculture are also located here. Although more than 90% of the Highlands was once forested, today a mere 20% of this area is covered by trees, and the percentage of forest cover is less than 4%. This is evidence of a high incidence of degradation of vegetation in the past, which has continued to the present. Land-use and land-cover changes have been particularly dynamic in the 20th century, during which climate change also began to have effects; wildlife in natural habitats have been restricted to those few areas that were preserved naturally due to rugged topography or natural aridity. Soil erosion has been severe throughout the Highlands, but mainly on agricultural land; the current severity and extent of soil degradation seriously threaten food security. [...] In: Hurni H, Wiesmann U, editors; with an international group of co-editors. Global Change and Sustainable Development: A Synthesis of Regional Experiences from Research Partnerships. Perspectives of the Swiss National Centre of Competence in Research (NCCR) North-South, University of Bern, Vol. 5. Bern, Switzerland: Geographica Bernensia, pp 187-207. Download
Soils on the global agenda
Hurni, Hans
Bern, Geographica Bernensia on behalf of the International Union of Soil Sciences (IUSS)
Landscape Transformation and Opportunities for Sustainable Land Management along the Eastern Escarpment of Wello (EEW), Ethiopia
Bantider, Amare
PhD Thesis, University of Bern, Switzerland For further information, please contact the author
Priority setting for further action
Hurni, Hans
Soils on the global agenda: The report provides an overview of international actions concerned with sustainable land management, based on contributions from members of the IASUS (International Actions for the Sustainable Use of Soil) network made at the Eurosoil Symposium. It also aims to concretise possible follow-up actions. On the occasion of the ISRIC workshop “World Soils Issues and Sustainable Development” held on 10 March 2006, the creation of a World Soils Council (WSC) was initiated. The report presents in its final chapter the WSC’s proposed vision, objectives, and structure. The report was produced by IASUS, a working group of the International Union of Soil Sciences (IUSS), with support from CDE and financing from SDC. This publication is a follow-up of: A World Soils Agenda (2002) In: Hans Hurni, Markus Giger, and Konrad Meyer, editors. 2006. Soils on the global agenda. Developing International Mechanisms for Sustainable Land Management. IASUS Working Group of the International Union of Soil Sciences (IUSS). Centre for Development and Environment, Bern. pp. 50-62 Download
Orchard-based agroforestry
Sanginboy, S.
In: Liniger HP, Critchley W, editors. 2007. Where the land is greener. Case studies and analysis of soil and water conservation initiatives worldwide. CTA, Wageningen, pp. 197-200. Order from: Earthprint
Management - Zwischen Schutz und Nutzung
Wiesmann, Urs
Welt der Alpen - Erbe der Welt: Wissenschaftler/Innen berichten über ihre Ergebnisse und Erkenntnisse aus der Alpen- und der globalen Gebirgsforschung. Es geht um die aktuelle Dynamik und Langzeitsignale, um Risikomanagement und Nachhaltigkeit, aber auch um Mythen und Lebensalltag sowie um Autonomie und Fremdbestimmung im globalen Zusammenhang. Jeder dieser vier Themenbereiche wird mit einem Einführungsartikel eingeleitet und beinhaltet zwei Beiträge aus den Alpen sowie zwei weitere entweder aus den Anden, dem Karakorum, Kaukasus, Himalaja, den Berggebieten in Ostafrika, Lesotho oder Neuseeland. Nach dem von der UNO proklamierten «Internationalen Jahr der Berge» stellt sich die Frage, was die Geographie leisten kann, um zur nachhaltigeren Entwicklung der Gebirgsräume in einer globalisierten Welt beizutragen. In: Wallner, A., Bäschlin, E., Grosjean, M., Labhart, T., Schüpbach, U., Wiesmann, U., editors. 2007. Welt der Alpen - Erbe der Welt. UNESCO Welterbe-Region Jungfrau-Aletsch-Bietschhorn. Bern: Haupt, pp. 271-283 Order this publication from: Haupt
Energy for Gorno Badakhshan: Hydropower and the Cultivation of Firewood
Droux, Roman
Master's Thesis, University of Bern, Switzerland This study provides an integral analysis of the energy situation and its consequences for land and energy resource use in rural areas of the Tajik Pamirs. It focuses on three main topics: (1) Energy consumption patterns at household and village levels, (2) use of micro and mini hydropower stations and their potential to relieve pressure on local biomass fuels, and (3) land degradation related to unsustainable energy resource use. Download
Towards sustainable land management
Liniger, Hanspeter
A recent review of the data gathered for the World Overview of Conservation Approaches and Technologies (WOCAT) program revealed a number of the key elements, which if missing, will limit the effectiveness of local efforts to achieve sustainable land management. A review of the WOCAT database indicates a wealth of untapped knowledge but also knowledge gaps, especially concerning the coverage and impact of soil and water conservation (SWC). The methodology and tools developed by WOCAT have been used by SWC specialists for critical sharing and review of their often fragmented knowledge, development of a database, identification of gaps and contradictions, and questioning and evaluation of their current perceptions and field experiences. This process builds understanding and capacity to support successful advancement of SWC and helps to avoid expensive and demoralizing mistakes. Proceedings of ISCO Conference 2004, Brisbane. Download
On the road through the Bolivian Amazon: A multi-level land governance analysis of deforestation
Bottazzi, Patrick
Studies show that collective property rights are more flexible than individual rights and improve sustainable forest management. Our case study in Bolivia (Beni department) confirms this, but shows that collective rights were granted in areas unfavourable to intensive land use. Collectively held land in Andean settlements appears less affected by deforestation than individually held land. Historical analysis of the region shows that the distribution of property rights results from political processes based on economic, spatial, and environmental strategies defined by multiple stakeholders. Collective titles were distributed to remote communities with less productive potential. Land rights are thus a secondary factor in local forest cover change and result from political compromises based on population, accessibility, environmental perceptions, and expected production/extraction incomes. Bottazzi P, Dao H. Accepted. On the road through the Bolivian Amazon: A multi-level land governance analysis of deforestation. Land Use Policy 30(1):137–146. Available at: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0264837712000440