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“It was hard to come to mutual understanding…” – The multidimensionality of social learning processes concerned with sustainable natural resource use in India, Africa and Latin America
Rist, Stephan
Sustainable natural resource use requires that multiple actors reassess their situation in a systemic perspective. This can be conceptualised as a social learning process between actors from rural communities and the experts from outside organisations. A specifically designed workshop provided the background for evaluating the potentials and constraints of intensified social learning processes. Case studies in rural communities in India, Bolivia, Peru and Mali showed that changes in the narratives of the participants of the workshop followed a similar temporal sequence relatively independently from their specific contexts. Social learning processes were found to be more likely to be successful if they 1) opened new space for communicative action, allowing for an intersubjective re-definition of the present situation, 2) contributed to rebalance the relationships between social capital and social, emotional and cognitive competencies within and between local and external actors. Journal of Systemic Practice and Action Research 19(3):219-237. Download from: SpringerLink
The difficult invension of participation in the Amarakaeri Communal Reserve, Peru
Alvarez, Alex
In: Galvin M, Haller T, editors. People, Protected Areas and Global Change: Participatory Conservation in Latin America, Africa, Asia and Europe. Perspectives of the Swiss National Centre of Competence in Research (NCCR) North-South, University of Bern, Vol. 3.Bern: Geographica Bernensia, pp 111-144. Download
Protected areas and indigenous peoples in Bolivia and Peru: Dilemmas, conflicts, and ways out.
Boillat, Sebastien
Recognition of the limitations of the traditional ‘fortress approach’ to governance of protected areas has led to a new model that seeks to reconcile environmental conservation with human development and promote participation by local populations. Based on a comparative analysis of four case studies in Bolivia and Peru, the present article shows the processes, problems and potentialities that emerge from the inclusion of indigenous peoples in the governance of protected areas. It demonstrates that there are many political, economic, social and cultural obstacles to reconciling conservation with development. [...] In: Hurni H, Wiesmann U.; with an international group of co-editors (eds). Global Change and Sustainable Development: A Synthesis of Regional Experiences from Research Partnerships. University of Bern, Switzerland: Geographica Bernensia, pp. 501-515 Download
Distribution and Transmission of Medicinal Plant Knowledge in the Andean Highlands
Mathez-Stiefel, Sarah-Lan
This paper presents a study of patterns in the distribution and transmission of medicinal plant knowledge in rural Andean communities in Peru and Bolivia. Interviews and freelisting exercises were conducted with 18 households at each study site. The amount of medicinal plant knowledge of households was compared in relation to their socioeconomic characteristics. Cluster analysis was applied to identify households that possessed similar knowledge. The different modes of knowledge transmission were also assessed. Our study shows that while the amount of plant knowledge is determined by individual motivation and experience, the type of knowledge is influenced by the community of residence, age, migratory activity, and market integration. Plant knowledge was equally transmitted vertically and horizontally, which indicates that it is first acquired within the family but then undergoes transformations as a result of subsequent contacts with other knowledge sources, including age peers. Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine doi:10.1155/2012/959285 Download
Can Andean medicine coexist with biomedical healthcare? A comparison of two rural communities in Peru and Bolivia
Mathez-Stiefel, Sarah-Lan
This paper presents a study of patterns in the distribution and transmission of medicinal plant knowledge in rural Andean communities in Peru and Bolivia. Interviews and freelisting exercises were conducted with 18 households at each study site. The amount of medicinal plant knowledge of households was compared in relation to their socioeconomic characteristics. Cluster analysis was applied to identify households that possessed similar knowledge. The different modes of knowledge transmission were also assessed. Our study shows that while the amount of plant knowledge is determined by individual motivation and experience, the type of knowledge is influenced by the community of residence, age, migratory activity, and market integration. Plant knowledge was equally transmitted vertically and horizontally, which indicates that it is first acquired within the family but then undergoes transformations as a result of subsequent contacts with other knowledge sources, including age peers. Mathez-Stiefel SL, Vandebroek I, Rist S. 2012. Can Andean medicine coexist with biomedical healthcare? A comparison of two rural communities in Peru and Bolivia. Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine 8:26. doi:10.1186/1746-4269-8-26
This article is open access at http://www.ethnobiomed.com/content/8/1/26
La richesse génétique du Sud convoitée par le Nord
Auroi, Claude
"De plus en plus souvent, les groupes pharmaceutiques et agroalimentaires font valoir des licences sur certaines propriétés d’espèces animales et végétales, s’assurant ainsi des droits de distribution lucratifs. En même temps, les pays en développement, «génétiquement riches», revendiquent une juste répartition des bénéfices. Cette évolution peut être illustrée par l’exemple du Pérou." Hotspot 2006, No. 14, pp. 6-7 Download from: Swiss Academy of Science
Institutional strengthening of the Amarakaeri Communal Reserve (Madre de Dios - Peruan Amazonia)
Galvin, Marc
Since 2002, the Peruvian government has allowed the Harakmbut people to conserve and manage natural resources within their ancestral territory. In order to alleviate the difficulties the Harakmbut had in establishing the institutional and operational framework of this protected area, a PAMS project aiming to strengthen indigenous institutions in the Amarakaeri Communal Reserve, has supported training of administrative leaders and forest rangers. Mountain, Research and Development, June 05 Download
La connaissance métisse
Galvin, Marc
PhD Thesis, Institut universitaire d'études du développement (iuéd), Geneva, Switzerland Metis Knowledge. Analysis of the Traditional Knowledge Policy in Peru: This research aimed to produce a critical analytical framework to understand the process of international norms creation, transmission into a national context and implementation at the local level. This objective has been addressed by choosing traditional knowledge (TK) issue as a strategy to analyze the multi-level governance process, and by studying especially the Peruvian Law for TK protection. This law voted in 2002 intended regulate the encounter of local supply with international demand. But a number of doubts have appeared: Is this law an efficient way of protecting traditional knowledge? Why is its implementation so slow? What is the potential of TK for nature conservation and sustainable development? Download